Business Website Checklist Help Page

The information shown on this page provides guidance for users of my Free Business Website Checklist Tool.



[intense_menu id=”wcmenu” type=”horizontal” mode=”mobile_responsive” name=”wc-menu” class=”wcmenu” top_background_color=”muted” top_font_color=”#102854″ top_hover_background_color=”#9aa8d6″ top_active_background_color=”#a3a4ad” padding_top=”10″ padding_bottom=”10″ padding_left=”10″ padding_right=”10″ margin_top=”0″ margin_bottom=”0″ margin_left=”0″ margin_right=”0″]




Section: Site Navigation
The menus and links on your site should help visitors intuitively find the information they need before making a purchase or enquiry.

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Does your navigation menu use conventional labels that are easy to understand?

Why it matters

A common error made by businesses when designing navigation menus is to assume that visitors will click through each option on the menu until they find the information they are looking for. In fact, most online visitors will navigate a website by first thinking about what information they want to find and then scanning the menu to look for the most obvious route to the relevant page.

Using non-conventional labels for your navigation menus is likely to confuse visitors and increase the likelihood that they will leave your site. Research has shown that even simple variations, such as using “Speak to us” instead of the more conventional “Contact us”, can significantly reduce the number of visitors who will make an enquiry.

How do I check this?

Check that your navigation menus use conventional labels, appear in the expected position on the page and are consistent across every page on the site.

Helpful Links:
Guide to Website Navigation

Video Tutorial:


Is it obvious to visitors what they will see before they click on a menu link?

Why it matters

When visitors click on a link in your menu, they will have a pre-conceived idea of what they expect to see on the page when they arrive. If what they see differs from their expectations, they are more likely to leave or return to the page they came from.

How do I check this?

Make sure that the content of all the pages closely corresponds to the menu label and uses the same terminology. For example, if your menu link reads “About Us”, then make sure that the heading of the page does not say “Our Team”. Also make sure that the content they are hoping to see is close to the top of the page and with as little other information as possible.

Video Tutorial:


Is a 'Contact Us' link shown at the right-most side of the menu?

Why it matters

Your visitors will expect to see menu labels in the same position as they appear on most other websites. For example, the “Contact Us” link should appear at the right-most position of the horizontal menu at the top of every page. Research has shown that placing menu labels in non-conventional positions confuses visitors and makes it more likely that they will leave your site.

How do I check this?

Check that your Contact Us” link appears to the right-most of your main navigation menu


Video Tutorial:


Is your main navigation menu easy to use on mobile devices?

Why it matters

Many websites will display a different form of navigation menu on mobile devices compared to larger screens. Some sites also use a “Hamburger” icon to represent the menu. Research has shown that the Hamburger icon is not yet fully recognised by the majority of visitors and can cause confusion when navigating the site.

How do I check this?

If your site does use a Hamburger icon, make sure that the word “Menu” also appears within the icon image. If your site does not use a Hamburger menu, make sure that there is sufficient space between the menu links for visitors on mobile devices who may be working on a small screen with fat thumbs.

Helpful Links:
Mobile Navigation Best Practices

Video Tutorial:


Does your company logo link back to the home page?

Why it matters

As well as having a “Home” link at the left-most side of the main navigation menu, it is also an accepted convention that the company logo will take the visitor back to the home page from any page.

How do I check this?

Make sure that your logo links back to the home page.

Video Tutorial:


Do all of your internal links open up in the same browser tab as the main website?

Why it matters

It is an accepted convention that when a visitor clicks on a link that takes them to another page within your site, the new page will open up in the same browser tab as the page on which the link was clicked. When the visitor clicks on a link that will take them to an external website or PDF document, the new page should open in a separate browser tab.

How do I check this?

Check that this convention has been applied correctly.

Video Tutorial: